Webinars and events

Information about any upcoming events and webinars from our research series will be posted on this page.
Recordings from past events are also published here (most recent first).

We are always looking for new ideas and potential speakers for future webinars, so please share your thoughts with us.

You can explore more ways to use the OED through our teaching resources page.

Upcoming webinars

OED Labs: exploring the Oxford English Dictionary’s prototype tools

Thursday, December 3 at 15:00 (GMT, UTC+0)

With the aim of offering researchers new, more direct, and more flexible ways to access the OED’s massive curated dataset and to gain richer insights in the English language, we have started the OED Labs initiative, by developing new digital tools and functionality for the exploration of the OED.

Tania Styles, Editor: Revision and Etymology, and James McCracken, Language Engineering Manager, will be presenting a live interactive online session where they will provide an overview of the latest tools and functionality under development.

This webinar is of interest to researchers across all disciplines interested in potential partnerships to help shape the development of new digital tools that harness the power of the OED aid the evolution of academic research.

Book your place here – if you can’t make it, don’t cancel your registration as the recording will be available after the live session, and all registrants will be notified.

Exploring the OED as a solution for academic needs

Thursday, November 12 at 16:00 (GMT, UTC+0)

The OED is a powerful online linguistic resource, providing features, tools, and language data which are essential for academic research and teaching. However, the extent of the OED capabilities is not always explored to its full potential.

Join Katherine Martin, Head of Product for Oxford Languages, Emily Hoyland, Product Manager, Dr Danica Salazar, World English Editor, and Ms Katherine Staples, Regional Training & Implementation Manager for a live interactive online session where they will provide an overview of all the OED can offer, particularly now that lecturers and libraries are facing an increasing need to transition to digital resources as a result of the pressures brought about by the Covid-19 crisis.

Book your place here – if you can’t make it, don’t cancel your registration as the recording will be available after the live session, and all registrants will be notified.

Webinar recordings

The language of Covid-19: a special OED update

Great social change tends to bring great linguistic change, and this has never been truer than in the Covid-19 crisis. We have seen new coinages; the adaptation of existing terms to talk about the pandemic and its social and economic impacts; and the widespread use of terms previously restricted to fields such as epidemiology and medicine. In order to take account of these developments, the OED has been updated outside of our regular quarterly releases.

OED editors Fiona McPherson, Trish Stewart, and Kate Wild have presented the rationale behind these special updates, the processes involved, and the resources used.

Watch the recording of this presentation here:

Due to the nature of this webinar, we are also making the presentation slides available:

The questions that we were not able to address during the live presentation were passed on to the panellists and their answers are available to view here.

The Cross-Dictionary Sense Linking Platform at Oxford Languages

The Cross-Dictionary Monolingual Sense Linking system (XD-MoSeLink) is a platform for linking dictionaries at the sense level developed at Oxford Languages.

It has been partly developed within the scope of the EU-funded Prêt-à-Llod project, which aims to generate methodologies for linking language data.

Oxford Languages’ Roser Saurí, Language Technology Strategist, Julian Grosse, Language Engineer, and Eirini Kouvara, Language Engineer, presented XD-MoSeLink in an online interactive session where they provided an overview of the platform and its use cases, functionality and the approach to its implementation.

Watch the recording of this presentation here:

What’s in a pronunciation? British and U.S. transcription models in the OED

Dr Catherine Sangster, Executive Editor: Pronunciations for Oxford Languages at Oxford University Press, and Dr Matthew Moreland, freelance pronunciation editor and Phonetics Lecturer at the University of East Anglia, have presented an interactive online talk in which they traced the evolution of OED’s pronunciation models, discussed their scope, and explored their current and future state.

Watch the recording of this presentation here:

The questions which could not be addressed during the session were answered by the panelists and are available to view here.

Oxford Languages and Prêt-à-Llod’s Cross-Dictionary Annotation Tool

Meritxell Gonzàlez, Language Engineer at Oxford University Press, the creator of the Cross-Dictionary Annotation Tool (XD-AT), presented session about this web-based tool developed as part of the Prêt-à-Llod project.

When aligning senses we can see that they are not always fully equivalent: sometimes one of the senses extends beyond the meaning conveyed by the others. XD-AT was developed to assist lexicographers to classify sense alignment distinctions between senses already aligned. It can also be extended into a general tool for marking up cross-dictionary mappings at the sense level.

Watch the recording of this webinar:

The questions which could not be addressed during the session were answered by the panelist and are available to view here.

Mama put in the OED: World Englishes and the Oxford English Dictionary

Dr Danica Salazar, OED World English Editor, and Mr Kingsley Ugwuanyi, one of OUP’s valued Nigerian English consultants, discussed how different varieties of World English are being included in the OED, the processes around this, and how researchers can get involved.

Watch the webinar below, and read the accompanying blog piece by Dr Danica Salazar on the OED blog: Circuit breakers, PPEs, and Veronica buckets: World Englishes and Covid-19.

There were many a few questions from the audience which we ran out of time to address on the live webinar. These have been passed on to the panelists and will be posted here soon – watch this space!

Applying a semantic tool to the OED: the Linguistic DNA Project

The Linguistic DNA project has designed a new computational linguistic approach to model historical word meanings by identifying and ranking a specific kind of lexical co-occurrence: co-occurring non-adjacent lexical trios in discursive spans of text.

Dr Seth Mehl, post-doctoral researcher at the University of Sheffield, shows us how this tool can be used to mine texts and identify the co-occurrence of specific lemmas, investigate the implication of these patterns on meaning, and inform the way definitions are written and presented by the OED.

Watch the webinar below, and read the associated blog article by Dr Mehl: Investigating the Linguistic DNA of life, body, and soul.

The questions which could not be addressed during the session were answered by the panelist and are available to view here.

Using the OED to investigate the implications of Douglas’s lexical choices in the Eneados

The Eneados, written by Gavin Douglas in 1513, is the first full translation of the Aeneid in a form of English and one of the first instances where ‘Scots’ is used as a linguistic identifier. 

Megan Bushnell from the English Faculty, University of Oxford, presented her research into Douglas’ lexical choices through a corpus-based approach.

The OED and historical text collections: discovering new words

This session provided an overview of the University of Helsinki’s research on neologism use, and how the OED can be used in digital humanities research generally.

If you’re interested in historical sociolinguistics, historical lexicology and lexicography, or in the complexities of applying computational methods to historical data, this talk is for you.

This webinar also offers the chance to hear directly from Dr Säily and Dr Mäkelä about what the future holds for this and other projects using the OED, and what they wish they knew before starting the project.

Read about one of the project’s most interesting findings on Cha before tea: finding earlier mentions in a corpus of early English letters (part 1) and on Cha before tea: finding earlier mentions in a corpus of early English letters (part 2).

Making the Most of the Oxford English Dictionary (UK)

Fiona McPherson, Senior Editor – OED New Words at Oxford University Press, presented about exploring the OED to make full use of its resources for research and teaching. She gave a virtual tour of the OED, showing how to unlock the potential of the historical and linguistic data in the dictionary’s entries.

Making the Most of the Oxford English Dictionary (US)

Katherine Martin, Head of U.S. Dictionaries at Oxford University Press, presented about exploring the OED to make full use of its resources for research and teaching. She gave a virtual tour of the OED, showing how to unlock the potential of the historical and linguistic data in the dictionary’s entries. She also provided an overview of some of the OED teaching resources available

Building Dictionaries with Crowdsourcing

Dr Sarah Ogilvie, former Director of Global Partnerships at Oxford Languages, Oxford University Press, spoke about how you can get involved in collecting words for the Oxford English Dictionary (OED).
David Martin, Principal Editor and Head of the New Words Group, OED, explained how a word gets into the dictionary once it is submitted by a member of the public.
Find out how a dictionary is created: now and in the past, without the help of technology. Follow a word’s journey until it is included in the dictionary, the reasons behind it, and why some words will never make it.

Please note that this presentation is available in audio only.


We are always looking for new ideas and potential speakers for future webinars, so please share your thoughts below.

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