Webinars and events

Information about any upcoming events and webinars will be posted on this page.
Recordings from past events are also published here (most recent first).

We are always looking for new ideas and potential speakers for future webinars, so please share your thoughts with us.

You can explore more ways to use the OED through our teaching resources page.

Upcoming webinars

Mama put in the OED: World Englishes and the Oxford English Dictionary

When: Thursday April 30, 11:00 am GMT (UTC+0)

Join Dr Danica Salazar, OED World English Editor, and Mr Kingsley Ugwuanyi, one of OUP’s valued Nigerian English consultants, for a live online session. 

They will be discussing how different varieties of World English are being included in the OED, the processes around this, and how researchers can get involved.

Register your interest >

Webinar recordings

Applying a semantic tool to the OED: the Linguistic DNA Project

The Linguistic DNA project has designed a new computational linguistic approach to model historical word meanings by identifying and ranking a specific kind of lexical co-occurrence: co-occurring non-adjacent lexical trios in discursive spans of text.

Dr Seth Mehl, post-doctoral researcher at the University of Sheffield, shows us how this tool can be used to mine texts and identify the co-occurrence of specific lemmas, investigate the implication of these patterns on meaning, and inform the way definitions are written and presented by the OED.

The recording of this webinar will be shared shortly.

Using the OED to investigate the implications of Douglas’s lexical choices in the Eneados

The Eneados, written by Gavin Douglas in 1513, is the first full translation of the Aeneid in a form of English and one of the first instances where ‘Scots’ is used as a linguistic identifier. 

Megan Bushnell from the English Faculty, University of Oxford, presented her research into Douglas’ lexical choices through a corpus-based approach.

The OED and historical text collections: discovering new words

This session provided an overview of the University of Helsinki’s research on neologism use, and how the OED can be used in digital humanities research generally.

If you’re interested in historical sociolinguistics, historical lexicology and lexicography, or in the complexities of applying computational methods to historical data, this talk is for you.

This webinar also offers the chance to hear directly from Dr Säily and Dr Mäkelä about what the future holds for this and other projects using the OED, and what they wish they knew before starting the project.

Read about one of the project’s most interesting findings on Cha before tea: finding earlier mentions in a corpus of early English letters (part 1) and on Cha before tea: finding earlier mentions in a corpus of early English letters (part 2).

Making the Most of the Oxford English Dictionary (UK)

Fiona McPherson, Senior Editor – OED New Words at Oxford University Press, presented about exploring the OED to make full use of its resources for research and teaching. She gave a virtual tour of the OED, showing how to unlock the potential of the historical and linguistic data in the dictionary’s entries.

Making the Most of the Oxford English Dictionary (US)

Katherine Martin, Head of U.S. Dictionaries at Oxford University Press, presented about exploring the OED to make full use of its resources for research and teaching. She gave a virtual tour of the OED, showing how to unlock the potential of the historical and linguistic data in the dictionary’s entries. She also provided an overview of some of the OED teaching resources available

Building Dictionaries with Crowdsourcing

Dr Sarah Ogilvie, Director of Global Partnerships at Oxford Languages, Oxford University Press, spoke about how you can get involved in collecting words for the Oxford English Dictionary (OED).
David Martin, Principal Editor and Head of the New Words Group, OED, explained how a word gets into the dictionary once it is submitted by a member of the public.
Find out how a dictionary is created: now and in the past, without the help of technology. Follow a word’s journey until it is included in the dictionary, the reasons behind it, and why some words will never make it.


We are always looking for new ideas and potential speakers for future webinars, so please share your thoughts below.

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