Updates to the OED

The OED is updated on a quarterly basis, and the updates make up the Third Edition of the OED. The material added to the dictionary includes revised versions of existing entries (which replace the older versions), and new words and senses both within the alphabetical sequence of revised entries and also across the whole A to Z range.

Our latest update

December 2018

More than 600 new words, senses, and subentries have been added to the Oxford English Dictionary in our latest update, including burkini, Dylanesque, and TGIF. Principal Editor, David Martin, explains some of the fun additions to be added in this update here.

In our release notes, World English Editor, Danica Salazar, discusses the words of South African origin that have been added in this update, as part of the dictionary’s continuing efforts to record the South African lexicon.

This update also welcomes taffety tarts to the OED’s word list. You can read more about the fascinating story of how this phrase came to the attention of our editors in this piece by Deputy Chief Editor, Philip Durkin.

View the full list of words added in this update.

 The OED publishes four updates a year. The next update will be added to the dictionary in 2019.

Previous updates

2018 updates

January 2018

More than 1,100 new words, senses, and subentries have been added to the Oxford English Dictionary in our latest update, including northern flicker, hazzled, and electric catfish.

This quarter sees the inclusion of long-established terms such as me time, more recent coinages including hangry and mansplaining, and words which have seen a shift in sense, such as snowflake. You can read more about the new and revised words and meanings in this article by Katherine Connor Martin, Head of US Dictionaries.

In our release notes this January, Edmund Weiner, Deputy Chief Editor of the OED, investigates the mysterious use of ‘sun scalds’ in Rudyard Kipling’s novel, Captains Courageous, here, and OED Associate Editor, Peter Gilliver, explores how sensationalist writing came to be known as ‘yellow journalism’ in this article.

Senior Editor, Matthew Bladen, delves into Greek mythology, taking on Titan in this article, which also reveals the amazing history of titch.

Whilst titch itself is not a new addition, nine months on from our Mumsnet appeal, the OED welcomes terms related to pregnancy and parenting to its pages. Read about Senior Editor of the OED, Fi Mooring’s, exploration of words such as baby-led weaning, diaper cake, and the alarmingly evocative poonami here.

See the words that have been added in this update.

March 2018

More than 700 new words, senses, and subentries have been added to the Oxford English Dictionary in our latest update, including cultural appropriation, trans*, and bubble water.

You can read about other new and revised meanings in this article by Katherine Connor Martin, Head of US Dictionaries.

In our release notes, Jonathan Dent, Senior Assistant Editor of the OED, investigates the formal language of sexuality and gender identity, exploring terms such as agender and intersexual here.

This update also sees the addition of more than a hundred Welsh English pronunciations for words borrowed from Welsh into English, such as cwtch, cariad, pennill, and pryddest. Find out more about this here.

June 2018

More than 900 new words, senses, and subentries have been added to the Oxford English Dictionary in our latest update, including binge-watch, impostor syndrome, and silent generation. You can read about other new and revised meanings in this article by Katherine Connor Martin, Head of US Dictionaries.

In our release notes, Senior Assistant Editor, Clifford Sofield, discusses the words related to energy that have been added in this update, from energy crisis to energy vampire.

Coinciding with the 90th anniversary of the publication of The House at Pooh Corner, several words from Winnie-the-Pooh have also been added to the OED in this update. Read more about this here.

Associate Editor, Eleanor Maier, discusses the results of last year’s Free the Word campaign, which helped to uncover a vast variety of regional terms, including antwacky and to have a monk on. Learn more about these words and find out how to contribute regional words of your own here.

This update also sees the addition of a number of Manx English words, such as joughtholtan, and buggane. Find out more about the Manx dialect in this article by Senior Assistant Editor Kelvin Corlett, and read more about the Manx English pronunciation model that has also been added.

View the full list of words added in this update.

October 2018

More than 1,400 new words, senses, and subentries have been added to the Oxford English Dictionary in our latest update, including nothingburger, fam, and not in Kansas anymore. You can read about other new and revised meanings in this article by Katherine Connor Martin, Head of US Dictionaries.

In our release notes, Senior Editor, Craig Leyland, discusses the words related to films that have been added in this update, from Tarantinoesque to scream queen.

Senior Assistant Editor, Jonathan Dent, explains the surprises that came with revising dunghill in this update. Read more about how astonishingly complete early predecessor dictionaries were, despite no access at all to searchable databases or electronic, large samples of English, here.

This update also sees the revision of a number of words in the English language that have begun to establish multiple uses far from their original meanings over time. Editorial Content Director, Graeme Diamond, uses bonnet as a way to explore this in his article.

View the full list of words added in this update.

 

2017 updates

March 2017

More than 500 new words, phrases, and senses have been added to the Oxford English Dictionary this quarter, including hate-watch, pogonophobia, sticky-outy, and things aren’t what they used to be. You can read more about the new and revised words and meanings in this article by Katherine Connor Martin, Head of US Dictionaries.

2017 marks Canada’s 150th anniversary, and our March update includes Canada and Canadian, as well as a host of people, animals, and plants native to Canada. Trish Stewart, Senior Assistant Editor of the OED, has taken a closer look at some of these additions in our release notes.

See the words that have been added in this update.

June 2017

More than 600 new words, phrases, and senses have been added to the Oxford English Dictionary this quarter, including hygge, post-truth, gin daisy, and widdly. You can read about other new and revised meanings in this article by Katherine Connor Martin, Head of US Dictionaries, and explore our timeline of veil words.

As this update also includes revisions to the word come, Denny Hilton, Senior Editor of the OED, explores the evolution of the term to come out in our release notes. You can also brush up on your serveor your backhand or volleyin our discussion of tennis terms.

Selected Letters of Norman Mailer (2014, edited by J. Michael Lennon) has recently been read as part of the OED’s reading programme, and the letters have provided several antedatings and some interesting insights into the challenges of finding evidence for swear words in the nineteenth and early twentieth century. You can read about this here.

See the words that have been added in this update.

September 2017

More than 1,000 new words, senses, and subentries have been added to the Oxford English Dictionary in our latest update, including worstest, fungivorous, and corporation pop.

This quarter sees the inclusion of both obsolete words, such as afound, and new words such as fatberg. You can read more about the new and revised words and meanings in this article by Katherine Connor Martin, Head of US Dictionaries.

Our release notes this September take a closer look at some of the new additions: Danica Salazar, World English Editor, explores a selection of words from Indian English that have been added to the OED, and Benjamin Norris, Senior Assistant Editor, explains the political evolution of beltway.

This update also includes an exciting antedating of white lie by almost two centuries, found because of the work of our Shakespeare’s World volunteers. Find out more about the antedating, and how to volunteer, here.

See the words that have been added in this update.

2016 updates

March 2016

The March 2016 update to the Oxford English Dictionary sees hundreds of new words, phrases, and senses, including vlog, bro-hug, and Dad’s Army. You can read more about the new and revised words and meanings in this article by Jonathan Dent, Senior Assistant Editor of the OED.

Associate Editor Eleanor Maier has written our release notes for this quarter, which take a closer look at the exciting history of the noun luck.

This update also sees the inclusion of a number of words from Singapore English and Hong Kong English.

See the words that have been added in this update.

June 2016

The June 2016 update sees the inclusion of more than 1,000 new words and senses in the Oxford English Dictionary, along with the revision or expansion of almost 2,000 entries. Additions this June include glamp, starchitect, starter marriage, and ROFL.

You can read more about the new words and meanings added to the Dictionary in an article by Jonathan Dent, from acronyms and initialisms to foodstuffs and modern conveniences (and inconveniences). Our Chief Editor, Michael Proffitt, has written an introduction to the exciting functional changes to the dictionary.

Long knife is an expression with a rich and varied past: it’s been in the OED since the first Supplement of 1933, but a revision this June sees the full history of long knife explored, as our Deputy Chief Editor Edmund Weiner explains in his article. Turning to the functional side of the online dictionary, you can learn more about new features: word frequency in search results and links to full passages from which our example quotations are taken. You can also find out more about the addition of written and spoken pronunciations for several varieties of World English.

See the words that have been added in this update.

September 2016

This month marks the centenary of Roald Dahl’s birth and, to mark the occasion, September’s quarterly update to the OED contains a range of revised and newly drafted entries connected to Roald Dahl and his writing, including splendiferous, human bean, and Dahlesque. Jonathan Dent, Senior Assistant Editor of the OED, takes a closer look at some of these words in this article.

As ever, the September update to OED contains more than 500 new words, phrases, and senses. Additions this quarter include Westminster bubble, YOLO, and yogalates.

See the words that have been added in this update.

December 2016

Around 500 new words, phrases, and senses have entered the Oxford English Dictionary this quarter, including glam-ma, YouTuber, and upstander.

We have a selection of release notes this December, each of which takes a closer look at some of our additions. The last few years have seen the emergence of the word Brexit, and you can read more about the huge increase in the use of the word, and how we go about defining it, in this article by Craig Leyland, Senior Editor of the OED. Katherine Connor Martin, Head of US Dictionaries, explores the interesting story of how two local words, Bama and shaka, became global. Ellie Stedall, Senior Assistant Editor with the OED, also takes a look at how to make sense of sense.

This December’s update also sees the addition of a number of words from the world of surfing, and David Martin has delved into the language of the sport in this article. You can also explore the chronology and meanings of our new surfing words with our interactive timeline.

Turning to the functional side of our online dictionary, we have added further links from OED quotations to source texts in Oxford Scholarly Editions Online. Find out how to use this new feature here.

See the words that have been added in this update.

2015 updates

March 2015

Around 500 new words, phrases, and senses have entered the Oxford English Dictionary in this update, and additions this quarter include white stuff, XL, and lookalike. You can read more about the new and revised words and meanings in this article by Jonathan Dent, Assistant Editor of the OED.

Deputy Chief Editor Edmund Weiner has written our release notes for this quarter, which investigate the different meanings of have, look, large, and late.

See the words that have been added in this update.

June 2015

Around 500 new words, phrases, and senses have entered the Oxford English Dictionary in this quarter’s update. Additions this June include twerk, FLOTUS, yarn-bombing, and crowdfund. You can read more about the new and revised words and meanings in this article by Katherine Connor Martin, Head of US Dictionaries.

The June 2015 update covers a huge variety of words, and our release notes reflect this. Graeme Diamond, our Editorial Content Director, discusses the fascinating history of the fedora, and Senior Editor Denny Hilton explores the lengthy revision of one of the shortest words in the Dictionary, go. Assistant Editor Jonathan Dent investigates the effect of the online world on English, including interweb and retweet. This update also sees the inclusion of a wide range of words from Philippine English, such as Mabuhay and carnap. You can read more about the new Filipino additions in this article by Research Fellow Danica Salazar.

See the words that have been added in this update.

See the new Filipino words that have been added in this update.

September 2015

Hundreds of new words, phrases, and senses have entered the Oxford English Dictionary in the September 2015 update. Additions this quarter include hoverboard, telly addict, water baby, and underwater hockey. You can read more about the new and revised words and meanings in this article by Jonathan Dent, Assistant Editor of the OED.

See the words that have been added in this update.

December 2015

Around 500 new words, phrases, and senses have entered the Oxford English Dictionary this quarter, including phablet, waybread, and bank of mom and dad. You can read more about the new and revised words and meanings in this article by Jonathan Dent, Senior Assistant Editor of the OED.

This update also sees three major new features added to the OED: audio pronunciations, word frequency markings, and short etymological summaries. Chief Editor of the OED, Michael Proffitt, introduces the exciting new features here. Our release notes this December take a closer look at these additions: Catherine Sangster, Head of Pronunciations, explains the audio pronunciations added this quarter; Philip Durkin, Deputy Chief Editor, explores the etymological summaries added to entries.

See the words that have been added in this update.

2014 updates

March 2014

More than 900 new words, phrases, and senses enter the Oxford English Dictionary in this update. Many appear in entries fully updated for the first time since the OED’s original edition. Some words, like book, death, and honey, have now been expanded by dozens of new items.

Additions this March include bestie, bookaholic, and beat boxer. You can read more about the new and revised words and meanings in this article by Katherine Martin, Head of US Dictionaries.

Deputy Chief Editors Philip Durkin and Edmund Weiner have written our release notes which delve a little deeper into the entries that have been revised; Philip Durkin looks in particular at empathy, employ/employee/employment, and empire/emperor, whilst Edmund Weiner investigates the history of toilet and its journey from the French word toile ‘cloth’ to the WC or restroom of today.

See the words that have been added in this update.

June 2014

This quarterly update marks the centenary of the outbreak of the First World War (1914-18) and OED’s editors have revisited and revised the dictionary’s coverage of some of the language and history associated with the war to end all wars.

Chief Editor Michael Proffitt sets the update in historical context and discusses the naming of wars, while Senior Editor Kate Wild and Associate Editor Andrew Ball explore the impact and enduring historical legacy of World War I on the English language.

You can also explore our illustrated timeline highlighting 100 Words that Define the First World War.

See the full list of World War I revisions.

See the words that have been added in this update.

September 2014

More than 600 new words, phrases, and senses have entered the Oxford English Dictionary in our latest update, which sees the revision of several everyday words, such as week, day, and group.

New additions this quarter include fact check, workaround, and First World problem. You can read more about the new and revised words and meanings in this article by Katherine Connor Martin, Head of US Dictionaries.

Our Deputy Chief Editors have written the release notes for September, which take a look at some of the entries in more detail. Philip Durkin examines the history of last, and its associated new phrases fun while it lasted and to last the course, whilst Edmund Weiner investigates the journey of some of the words added to the OED this year, including hi-fi, science fiction, and DIY.

See the words that have been added in this update.

December 2014

More than 500 new words, phrases, and senses have entered the Oxford English Dictionary in December’s update. Many entries have been fully revised for the first time in over 90 years, including good, better, best, and well.

Additions this quarter include g’day, un-PC, and BYOD. You can read more about the new and revised words and meanings in this article by Jonathan Dent, Assistant Editor of the OED.

Our Deputy Chief Editors have written the release notes for this update, which take a look at some of the entries in more detail. Philip Durkin investigates words beginning with un- and their counterparts; Edmund Weiner explores un- words with multiple meanings, including unrigged and unravelled.

See the words that have been added in this update.

2013 updates

December 2013

The December update to the OED includes over 500 new words, phrases, and senses, as well as more than a thousand newly revised entries. Our selections are based on frequency – in general English usage, or of searches by users of OED Online – so the batches of words in quarterly releases are typically diverse.

You can read more about the new and revised words and meanings, including emoji, nappy valley, and sillytonian, in this article by Katherine Martin.

Or take a look at the release notes for this quarter where Graeme Diamond, Principal Editor, narrates the twists in the tale of fairy, and Edmund Weiner, deputy Chief Editor of the OED, writes elegantly about the history of beauty.

See the words that have been added in this update.

September 2013

The September update completes the revision of the pronoun entries in the OED with he, she, it and they; changes seen include the use of it adjectivally for “fashionable”, as in It Girl. Two clusters that have been revised include great and grey, continuing the colour word theme seen in recent updates.

New words and meanings include milchig, fleishig, em>buzzworthy, and bucket list.

You can read more about the revisions and new words in the September 2013 update in this article by the Chief Editor of the OED, John Simpson (his last before retiring in October).

See the words that have been added in this update.

June 2013

The latest range of revised and updated OED entries focuses on the revision of three words hand,head, and heart – covering 2,875 headwords, compounds, and other expressions including a head for business, handyman special, and heart-wrenching.

Alongside these there are key new additions and revisions from the spheres of technology, popular culture, and current affairs: dad dancing, em>epic, fiscal cliff, flash mob, follow, geekery, pay day lending, the silent treatment, and tweet.

You can read more about the revisions and new words in the June 2013 update in this article by the Chief Editor of the OED, John Simpson.

See the words that have been added in this update.

March 2013

The March update focused on revision of blue, covering 614 headwords, compounds, and other expressions.
New words and meanings include boccia, podium, and whip-smart. Alongside these, we have major clusters around the ranges of: audience and audio-; Caribbean; credit and Creole; friend; gang and gangster; serial and serious, smart, and the volcano words.
You can read more about the revisions and new words in the March 2013 update in this article by the Chief Editor of the OED, John Simpson.
See the words that have been added in this update.

2012 updates

March 2012

This March, we have added 1,947 new and revised entries to the OED, totalling 5,858 lexical items. As well a range of new words, this update sees the revision of time, which is the most-used noun in the English language. Read more about our new additions here, or find out more about the latest steps in our revision programme here.

See the words that have been added in this update.

June 2012

In the June 2012 update we revise some 2,500 SUB- and SUPER- words, including subculture, subvert, supercool, superhero, and supernatural. Super- has been a particularly productive prefix in American political language in 2012: new additions include topical words like super PAC, supermajority, and superdelegate.

The revision also sees new words from the world of economics (quantitative easing), technology (subdomain), and leisure (dance-off). You can read more about the revisions and new words in the June update in this article by the Chief Editor John Simpson. .

We have also improved the OED’s search functionality. Over one million current and historical inflected forms have been added to the database, and author and work titles have been expanded throughout – improving the success of searches for words or quotations in the OED.

See the words that have been added in this update.

September 2012

This quarter sees full updates from affable to always, a sequence that was included in the very first instalment of the OED (A – ant) in 1884. Brand new additions to the OED include mocap, affordable housing, Exchange Alley, and achoo.

You can read more about the revisions and new words in the September update in this article by the Chief Editor of the OED, John Simpson.

Functionality update

We have also made some changes to how an entry’s editing history is shown online, to make the distinction between revised and unrevised entries clearer in OED Online. Find out more here.

See the words that have been added in this update.

December 2012

The revised and updated OED entries in this update covers two general themes: transport and infection. Alongside these, we have major clusters around five keywords: ice, key, save, small, and state. Brand new additions include senioritis, Captcha, and xoloitzcuintli. Read John Simpson’s commentary here.

See the words that have been added in this update.

2011 updates

March 2011

Our latest update to the OED, published on 24 March, revises more than 1,900 entries and adds new words from across the dictionary. It also sees the launch of our new website, which has come a long way since we first moved the dictionary online in 2000. Our Chief Editor has written a commentary on the revisions, as well as what has changed in the world of online dictionaries, and Graeme Diamond and Katherine Martin have provided our new words notes for this quarter.

See the words that have been added in this update.

June 2011

We have added hundreds of words to the OED this quarter, including several to areas that we have already revised. That is one of the benefits of having an online dictionary and, rather topically, this update contains words from the world of computers, including net-neutrality and autocomplete. Read our new words notes to find out more about our newest additions, or take a look at John Simpson’s commentary to find out more about the words that have been revised this quarter.

See the words that have been added in this update.

September 2011

This quarter sees hundreds more words enter the dictionary, including Britcom and securocrat. Read our notes on the latest revision here, or find out more about the new words that have been added in this update.

See the words that have been added in this update.

December 2011

We haven’t just been monitoring the language over the last few months. We’ve also been monitoring how close the OED has come to the milestone of 100,000 new and revised entries published since March 2000, when the dictionary first went online with updated material.
This December 2011 release (AA-AEVUM) takes us past that milestone, and at present the running total stands at 102,133 entries (or 37% of the dictionary entries on OED Online).
The update sees the inclusion of earworm, a catchy tune or piece of music which persistently stays in a person’s mind, especially to the point of irritation, and zero emission. You can read more about our new words in this article by Graeme Diamond, and read our Chief Editor’s commentary here.

See the words that have been added in this update.

2010 updates

March 2010

On 11 March 2010 the New Edition was updated with new materials which fall into three maincategories: (a) alphabetical series of revised entries based around significant words from across the alphabet; (b)the sequence of revised entries from requalify to Rg; (c) a series of new entries and senses from across the alphabet. The OED’s chief editor, John Simpson, provides some observations on the revision of this section of the alphabet, while Michael Proffitt and Graeme Diamond comment on some of the most interesting new words in the batch.
See the words that have been added in this update.

June 2010

On 10 June 2010 the alphabetical range Rh-rococoesque was added to the New Edition: every word in this range has been thoroughly revised and updated. The OED’s chief editor, John Simpson, provides some observations on the revision of this section of the alphabet, and Katherine Martin comments on some of the most interesting new words in the batch.

See the words that have been added in this update.

September 2010

The sixteenth of this month saw our latest update to the OED, which saw the full revision of the range rod-rotness. John Simpson has written some notes on our latest revisions, and Graeme Diamond has provided a commentary on some of our new words.

See the words that have been added in this update.

December 2010

The latest update of the OED, published on 1 December 2010, revises more than 2,400 entries and adds new words from across the dictionary. The OED’s chief editor, John Simpson, provides some observations on the revisions in this update, and Graeme Diamond comments on some of the most interesting new words in the batch.

See the words that have been added in this update.

2009 updates

March 2009

We updated the Third Edition of the dictionary with revisions in several alphabetical ranges in this update. John Simpson, our Chief Editor, has written about our latest revision, which sees the updating of community and human, among other words.

See the words that have been added in this update.

June 2009

Our latest update, on 11 June, saw the revision and addition of words within the range rean-recyclist, as well as the inclusion of many new words from across the alphabet. John Simpson, our Chief Editor, has written a commentary on the revision of this section of the alphabet, and Graeme Diamond, Principal Editor, has written some notes on some of the more interesting new words.

See the words that have been added in this update.

September 2009

On 10 September 2009 the New Edition was updated with new materials which fall into three main categories: (a) alphabetical series of revised entries based around significant words from across the alphabet; (b) the sequence of revised entries from red to refulgent; (c) a series of new entries and senses from across the alphabet. For further details see the Chief Editor’s commentary on the latest revision.

See the words that have been added in this update.

December 2009

The range refund-reputeless was added to the dictionary on 10 December, alongside a batch of words that fall outside the alphabetical range. The OED’s Chief Editor, John Simpson, has written some notes on the revision of this section, and the Managing Editor, Michael Proffitt, has written our new words notes.

See the words that have been added in this update.

2008 updates

March 2008

On 13 March 2008 the New Edition was updated with revised entries in a series of discrete alphabetical ranges, as well as the addition of new entries from across the alphabet. In some ranges, not every entry was revised, as editorial effort was concentrated on the most significant groups of related words. In addition, about 30 virus names were revised across the alphabet. For further details see the Chief Editor’s commentary on the latest revision.

See the words that have been added in this update.

June 2008

On 12 June 2008 the alphabetical range quittal-ramvert was added to the New Edition: every word in this range has been thoroughly revised and updated. The new additions include the noun rollercoastering, the first use of which was recorded in 1913 in the Los Angeles Times: ‘There will be regular debauches of bump-the-bumps and howling sprees of merry-go-rounding and roller-coastering’ .

See the words that have been added in this update.

September 2008

This quarter, we have updated the dictionary with revised entries from a series of discrete alphabetical ranges, as well as new entries from across the alphabet. In some ranges, not every entry was revised as our editors were focusing on the most significant groups of related words. In addition, entries for days of the week and months of the year were revised. Read more about the latest revisions in the Chief Editor’s commentary on the latest revision.

See the words that have been added in this update.

December 2008

On 11 December 2008 the alphabetical range ran-reamy was added to the New Edition: every word in this range has been thoroughly revised and updated. Below are listed all the new words in the range. We have also added a further list of new words from across the alphabet.

The OED’s chief editor, John Simpson, provides some observations on the revision of this section of the alphabet, and Graeme Diamond comments on some of the most interesting new words in the batch.

See the words that have been added in this update.

2007 updates

March 2007

On 15 March 2007 the alphabetical range Prakrit-prim was added to the New Edition: every word in this range has been thoroughly revised and updated.
The OED’s chief editor, John Simpson, has provided some observations on the revision of this section of the alphabet, and Graeme Diamond comments on some of the most interesting new words in the batch.

See the words that have been added in this update.

June 2007

14 June sees the inclusion of the range prima-poteose in the OED, as well as a further selection of words from across the alphabet. A few of our new additions are princessy, suitable for a princess, and Prince Valiant, chiefly North American term for a hairstyle resembling that of any representations of Prince Valiant.

See the words that have been added in this update.

September 2007

On 14 September, we added the thoroughly revised and updated range proter-purposive to the dictionary, as well as a selection of new words from across the alphabet. This update sees the inclusion of pullikins, which are forceps or pliers used to extract teeth. Now historical, the term seems to have come from pull plus kins, the i added apparently for euphony.

See the words that have been added in this update.

December 2007

Our December update this year sees the completion of the revision of words beginning with p, and covers purpress-quit shilling as well as other words from across the alphabet. A quit shilling is a sum of money spent by a prisoner in terms of his or her acquittal, although the word is now obsolete.

See the words that have been added in this update.

2006 updates

March 2006

We published our latest range of entries, philanthropal-pimento, on the sixteenth of the month, alongside a batch of new entries from across the alphabet. New words this quarter include phlebotomy and photo-imaging. Phwoar! What an update.

See the words that have been added in this update.

June 2006

15 June sees the alphabetical range pi-mesic-pleating added to the New Edition, as well as several words outside of the sequence. Additions include Plato’s cave and, less philosophically, playtime.

See the words that have been added in this update.

September 2006

The range of entries pleb-Pomak was published on 14 September, as well as many words from across the alphabet. One of our new words is pletzel, a flat roll, similar to a bagel, with a crisp or chewy texture.

See the words that have been added in this update.

December 2006

This 14 December, we have added our latest batch of new and revised words to the Third Edition of the OED, which includes pomander-prajnaparamita. As well as Pompadour pink, power-up, and poster child have joined the dictionary.

See the words that have been added in this update.

2005 updates

March 2005

The tenth of this month sees the completion of the letter o in our revision programme as we add our new and revised entries for the batch ovesting-Papua New Guinean to the Third Edition. Non-alphabetical additions this quarter include cool Britannia and diddly-squat.

See the words that have been added in this update.

June 2005

This quarter, we have continued to update the Third Edition and have added new and revised entries for the range papula-Paul, as well as to other areas of the alphabet. In our update, which went live on the 25 June, we revised party, n., and words such as party hat, party leadership, party-pooping, and party whip have been included in its senses.

See the words that have been added in this update.

September 2005

The range of entries Paul-Bunnell-perfay has been published in our September update, which went live on 18 September . Perfay, an obsolete interjection, means ‘by my faith; truly; indeed, certainly’. First used in c1300, it seems to have fallen out of use in the seventieth and eighteenth centuries only to be revived in archaic and poetic use in the nineteenth century.

See the words that have been added in this update.

December 2005

15 December saw the publication of the range of entries perfect-philandering in the New Edition, as well as many new words from across the alphabet. As well as perfect age, perfect crime, and perfect rhyme, we have added Philadelphia cheesesteak: a sandwich that is typically made with slices of fried beef, onions, and cheese, and served in a hard roll.

See the words that have been added in this update.

2004 update

March 2004

Entries in the range nud-ollycrock comprise the bulk of the latest batch of words to enter the OED on 11 March. Our latest additions include old schooler and water birth, as well as yeehaw and .

See the words that have been added in this update.

June 2004

As of our last update in June, the New Edition revision programme reached the alphabetical range beginning with o, and this release sees the inclusion and revision of words in the range olm-orature, as well as others from across the alphabet.Omega-3, ooff, and opinionatedly have all been added, as have TV land and television land.

See the words that have been added in this update.

September 2004

On 9 September, we added our new range of entries to the OED Online, orb-ottroye, as well as a series of other words from across the alphabet, and the dictionary has taken a caffeine boost with the addition of Caffè latte, caffè espresso, and caffè macchiato.

See the words that have been added in this update.

December 2004

On the ninth of the month, we released our latest batch of entries, which includes words from ou-overzealousness. Outside of the alphabetical range, we have added BBQ and vavoom, as well as the verbs problem-solve andsupersize.

See the words that have been added in this update.

2003 updates

March 2003

13 Mach saw the publication of our latest range of new and revised entries for the Third Edition of the OED, Motswana-mussy. As well as computing terms such as MUD and multibit, this update sees the inclusion of Muggle. Coined by J. K. Rowling in the Harry Potter series, it denotes a person who possesses no magical powers and, in extended use, a person who lacks a particular skill or who is regarded as inferior in some way. Additions outside of our alphabetical range this quarter include beanie and

See the words that have been added in this update.

June 2003

On 12 June, we published our latest range of revisions and additions, which sees the completion (for now!) of words beginning with m: must-necessity. This must-read update includes mutsuddy, y bad, and nebbishly, as well as our usual out-of-range additions.

See the words that have been added in this update.

September 2003

11 September saw the publication of necial-Nipissing, as well as many out-of-range additions. New-dead, newbie, and newsmongering have all been added this quarter.

See the words that have been added in this update.

December 2003

On the eleventh of the month, we released our latest batch of entries, which includes words from Nipkow disc-nuculoid. One of additions is noctivigate which is a rare verb meaning to wander or roam about at night.

See the words that have been added in this update.

2002 updates

March 2002

Entries within the range mid-Mirzapur were published on 14 March, as well as a selection of words from elsewhere in the alphabet. Additions this quarter include midibus, all-you-can-eat, and brain-box.

See the words that have been added in this update.

June 2002

On 13 June, we published our latest range of revisions and additions, mis-mitzvah, as well as a mittful of words from across the alphabet. Our new words include prebiotic and misery guts.

See the words that have been added in this update.

September 2002

12 September saw the publication of the range of entries mivvy-monnisher, as well as our usual out-of-range additions. The adjective Mizzle-shinned, having one’s legs red and blotched from sitting too near a fire, is one of our new words, as is evo-devo, which is a branch of biology concerned with the interaction of evolutionary developmental processes.

See the words that have been added in this update.

December 2002

Our December update focused on entries within mono-motrix, and contains mono-brow and morna, a song of lament in the Cape Verde Islands.

See the words that have been added in this update.

2001 updates

March 2001

On 15 March 2001, we published entries within the range mast-meaty. Highlights include mathlete and the now-historical Matthew’s pill, which takes its name from Richard Matthew, a seventeenth-century English medical practitioner, and denotes a pill sold as an antidote to various poisons.

See the words that have been added in this update.

June 2001

On 14 June 2001 we added new words from the range of entries mebbe-memsahib. We have also added a further list of new words from across the alphabet, including acid jazz and DJ-ing.

See the words that have been added in this update.

September 2001

13 September saw the publication of the range of entries Men-mesylation in the New Edition, as well as a selection of words from across the alphabet. Additions include meringue as a verb, as well as DVD, e-book, and e-ticket.

See the words that have been added in this update.

December 2001

Our December update focused on entries within the range met-micturition, as well as several words from across the alphabet such as girl power and text message.

See the words that have been added in this update.

2000 updates

March 2000

The launch of the OED Online

14 March 2000 saw the launch of the OED Online. Available online for the first time was the entire text of OED’s Second Edition (1989) and Additions Series (1993 and 1997), along with the first range of revised and new entries from the revision programme. The first range of New Edition entries are M-mahurat.

See the words that have been added in this update.

June 2000

On 15 June, we published a new range of entries, mai-mamzer, for the Third Edition of the OED. This update also saw the addition of the Bibliography to the Second Edition”.

See the words that have been added in this update.

September 2000

On 15 September, we added the range of entries man-march stone in the New Edition, which includes man haul and Manhattanize.

See the words that have been added in this update.

June 2000

On 15 June, we published a new range of entries, mai-mamzer, for the Third Edition of the OED. This update also saw the addition of the Bibliography to the Second Edition”.

See the words that have been added in this update.

December 2000

14 December 2000 saw the publication of the range marciaton-massymoreto the Third Edition, which includes margherita, both as an adjective and noun, and marley, which is a name for a child’s marble in Scotland, Northern Ireland, and some areas of England.

See the words that have been added in this update.

Tags: